Ontario Nature Blog

Protecting wild species and wild spaces since 1931

Tag: health (Page 1 of 2)

The wild, weird world of mussels

Credit: Stephanie Muckle

Credit: Stephanie Muckle

Wartyback, snuffbox, round pigtoe, pocketbook … no, we haven’t gone crazy. These are just a few of the 41 wild and weird freshwater mussel species found in Ontario.

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Top 10 reasons for protected areas

Credit: Christopher Woo; CC BY 2.0

In 2010, Canada and the parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity committed to protecting at least 17 per cent of the world’s lands and inland waters by 2020. With the percentage of protected areas in Ontario currently at just over 10 percent, it’s time for an all-out effort to meet the target. Here’s why:

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5 things you may not know about forests

Oak trees in High Park

Oak trees in High Park; Credit: Felipe Villegas

I’ve always been enchanted by forests: the delicate understory flowers, the smell of decomposing wood, the sound of leaves blowing in the wind—it’s magical! As a child, I spent hours running in the woods, imagining myself as Disney’s Pocahontas, naming my favourite trees and befriending squirrels and chipmunks. After studying forest conservation, my passion has become an academic interest.

Here are some of the things I’ve learned about forests, both as a student and as a naturalist:

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Let’s Support Ontario’s Wild Pollinators

brown-belted-bumble-bee-on-cupplant_sc-confirmed_diana-troya

Brown-belted bumblebee; Credit: Diana Troya

For most of us, the word ‘pollinator’ brings to mind non-native honeybees. Wild pollinators, however, are the most widespread and numerous of all pollinators. This includes native wild bees, wasps, flies, ants, butterflies, moths and certain beetles, birds and bats.

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Greenbelt expansion is a legacy achievement – but it needs to be bigger and bolder

green field east gwillimbury area

On Tuesday, I headed to Mississauga’s Credit River for the government’s announcement on their proposed amendments to the plans that protect the Greenbelt, Oak Ridges Moraine, and Niagara Escarpment, and guide growth in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH).

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