Ontario Nature Blog

Protecting wild species and wild spaces since 1931

Author: Noah Cole (Page 1 of 4)

Help protect wetlands

Wye Marsh, photo credit: A. Delray, The Forest Vixen

Wye Marsh, photo credit: A. Delray, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Prior to the 2014 provincial election, Premier Kathleen Wynne pledged to reverse wetland loss by 2025. Accordingly, the Province has proposed a new wetland conservation strategy, which is open for public comment until November 16, 2016. The strategy, however, is not up to the task of protecting and recovering Ontario’s wetlands. Given weak overall targets, loose commitments and the failure to earmark areas for government investment, it is a recipe for inaction and delay.

The overarching target of the proposed strategy is to achieve no net loss of wetlands by 2030. This means accepting ongoing wetland loss for the next 14 years. This target is woefully short of the Premier’s pledge. Considering the immense value of wetlands, the history of loss and the urgent need to protect them this is nothing short of ridiculous.

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Antler flies and the moose antler – an ecosystem unto itself!

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You’re out for a walk in the woods and come across a dropped moose antler. In your excitement you pick-up the hefty piece of bone and think about taking it home, mounting it on your wall, placing it on the mantelpiece, or stashing it in the garage to collect dust, but is that really a good idea?

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A Guide to Some of Ontario’s Spiders

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Betrayed (yet again) Ontario unravels Greenbelt protection for species at risk

Part 3 of a 3 part blog series about the Province’s failure to uphold strong protections for our most vulnerable plants and animals.

monarch butterfly at Malcolm Bluff Shores Nature Reserve, Credit: Noah Cole

monarch butterfly at Malcolm Bluff Shores Nature Reserve, Credit: Noah Cole

When we celebrated the passing of Ontario’s new Endangered Species Act (ESA) back in 2007, I could never have imagined that it might serve as a Trojan horse for development. Yet that is exactly what may happen. Alas, our tarnished and tattered ESA may open the door to development in the habitat of species at risk in the Greenbelt.

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Removing Plant Invaders!

One challenge every land trust faces is managing invasive species. Invasive plants and wildlife are often accidentally brought to Ontario from other parts of the world and, in the absence of natural predators and competitors, crowd out native species. Some familiar invaders include dog-strangling vine, emerald ash borer and garlic mustard.

Credit: Smera Sukumar

Credit: Smera Sukumar

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