Ontario Nature 2016 Conservation Awards recipients group photo (left to right): Andrew Reeves for Shawn Micallef, Karen Bateman and Marilyn Swaby, Bill McIlveen, Steve Irvine for Joe Johnson, Stephanie Sobek-Swant for Michael Barnstijn and Louise MacCallum, Larry Cornelis, Jenn Bock and Kyle Horner for Wild Ontario, Beverly Kingdon, Wendy Burton for Oakville Mayor Robert Burton

Noah Cole

Past Conservation Award Winners

Ontario Nature Conservation Award Recipients for 2016

 

The Ontario Nature Conservation Awards recognize excellence by honouring individuals, groups, government agencies and corporations who have worked to protect nature in Ontario.

Larry Cornelis, former president of Lambton Wildlife Inc. and the Sydenham Field Naturalists, received the Ontario Nature Achievement Award for his conservation work in southwestern Ontario. He is a sought-after speaker for local naturalist clubs and gardening groups, and also leads hikes for Lambton Wildlife’s young naturalists group and Sarnia Girl Guides.

Dorothy Tiedje received the W.E. Saunders Natural History Award for her outstanding contributions to the field of botany in Ontario. 

Bill McIlveen received the W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award for his dedication to surveying and writing about Ontario’s wildlife and plants. He has authored more than 300 articles and reports on nature in the province.

Karen Bateman and Marilyn Swaby received the Richards Education Award for their longtime commitment to connecting children and youth with nature. They both volunteer with Nature Guelph’s Young Naturalists Program.

Oakville Mayor, Robert Burton received the Lee Symmes Municipal Award for his work to make Oakville one of the leading municipalities on environmental issues.

Joe Johnson received the Ian Shenstone Fraser Memorial Award for his contribution to numerous life science reports for the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. 

Michael Barnstijn and Louise MacCallum, founding members of rare Charitable Research Reserve, received the Steve Hounsell Greenway Award. Their work ensures over 900 acres of highly sensitive lands remain protected and accessible to the public. 

Beverly Kingdon received the J.R. Dymond Public Service Award for her tireless efforts to reintroduce and protect trumpeter swans in Ontario.

Shawn Micallef received the Carl Nunn Media and Conservation Award for his work with Spacing Magazine and The Toronto Star to capture nature in urban areas and remind readers they belong to a broader environment.

Wild Ontario received the Ontario Nature Corporate Award for its science-based environmental education throughout southwestern Ontario using live, non-releasable birds-of-prey.

 

Ontario Nature Conservation Award Recipients for 2015

 

The Ontario Nature Conservation Awards recognize excellence by honouring individuals, groups, government agencies and corporations who have worked to protect nature in Ontario.

Scott Gillingwater received the W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award for his dedication to protecting at-risk species and helping to ensure common species remain common.

Bud Rowe, former president of the Kingston Field Naturalists, received the W.E. Saunders Natural History Award for his outstanding contributions to the protection of natural areas in eastern Ontario.

Jennifer Howard received the Richards Education Award for her lifelong commitment to conservation. She spends countless hours volunteering for causes related to wildlife rescue and rehabilitation, as well as education and conservation programs.

SongbirdSOS Productions received the Carl Nunn Media and Conservation Award for The Messenger. The award-winning documentary raised awareness of the mass depletion of songbird populations around the world.

Simon de Boer received the Steve Hounsell Greenway Award for his contributions to the Greenway Grey-Bruce project. Simon’s efforts were instrumental to the program’s success as he helped bridge the gap between conservationists and farmers.

Alan Macnaughton received the Ontario Nature Achievement Award for his commitment to citizen science initiatives, in particular the creation of an interactive mapping application. Various companies and organizations use his application to inform their research and survey efforts, consultation work and environmental assessments.

Freeman Boyd received the Ian Shenstone Fraser Memorial Award for his contribution to naturalists clubs across Ontario and for the creation of the Young Naturalists Club. 

City of London received the Lee Symmes Municipal Award for its commitment to protecting Environmentally Significant Areas. 

Friends of the Rouge Watershed received the J.R. Dymond Public Service Award for its efforts green-space promotion and education. The award also honours the group’s commitment to improving water quality and restoring habitat in the Rouge River watershed and Toronto’s Great Lakes Water Quality Area of Concern.

Ontario Nature Conservation Award Recipients for 2014

 

The Ontario Nature Conservation Awards recognize excellence by honouring individuals, groups, government agencies and corporations who have worked to protect nature in Ontario.

Chief Roger Fobister

Grassy Narrows First Nation received the J.R. Dymond Public Service Award for its commitment to environmental justice and sustainability in the Wabigoon-English River watershed, northeast of Lake of the Woods.

Dr. Paul Keddy

Dr. Paul Keddy of Carleton Place received the W.E. Saunders Natural History Award for his dedication to the protection of Lanark County’s natural heritage. 

Jerrold and Joan Asling

Jerrold and Joan Asling of Hanover received the W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award for 30 plus years of restoring the eastern bluebird population in Grey and Bruce counties. 

Grant Linney

Grant Linney of Dundas received the Richards Education Award for his proficiency in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic advocates for nature.

Otto Peter for Thickson's Woods Land Trust

Dennis Barry and Margaret Carney received the Steve Hounsell Greenway Award for their 30-year commitment to the protection and management of Thickson’s Woods in south Whitby. Accepted by Otto Peter, President of Thickson's Woods Land Trust.

John Barber

Veteran Toronto Star journalist John Barber received the Carl Nunn Media and Conservation Award for his 2014 article series on the Greenbelt. Over the course of six stories, John detailed the Greenbelt’s origins, successes and challenges, as a lead-up to the review of Ontario’s Greenbelt Plan, which is currently underway. 

Todd Salter/City of Guelph

City of Guelph received the Lee Symmes Municipal Award for its dedication to the protection of its natural heritage, and – more specifically – its Natural Heritage Strategy and policy directions, which were approved in June of last year. 

Cindy Cohanim/Calstone

Calstone Inc., a Scarborough-based, family-owned manufacturer of steel office furniture, received the Ontario Nature Corporate Award for its commitment to sustainable business practices. The company’s remanufacturing program guarantees that Calstone-manufactured products will never see a landfill site. 

 

 

Recipients for 2013

2013 Award Winners

Award winners (left to right): Andrew Reeves, Dale Leadbeater and Anne Barbour of CKL Flora, Beth Gilhespy of Bruce Trail Conservancy, Kyle Clarke, Donald J. Kerr, Mark Eastman, Graham MacDonald for Craig Campbell, and Tom Lobb.

On June 21, Ontario Nature recognized the exceptional contributions to the protection of wild species and spaces made by seven individuals and two groups. The awards ceremony was part of the 83rd annual gathering that took place at YMCA Geneva Park on the shores of Lake Couchiching.

Tom Lobb, a farmer and lifelong naturalist, received the Ontario Nature Achievement Award for his outstanding contribution to the organization. Lobb is a steward of the George G. Newton Nature Reserve south of Goderich and has assisted with turtle recovery projects and queensnake surveys.

Andrew Reeves, a political writer, geographer, environmentalist and reporter with Queen’s Park Briefing, received the Carl Nunn Media and Conservation Award for effectively communicating important conservation issues. Last year alone, Reeves wrote six articles about measures – and Ontario nature’s response to them – that have weakened the Endangered Species Act.

Craig Campbell, a member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Field Naturalists, received the W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award for demonstrating outstanding personal service and commitment to conservation. Campbell has devoted his working life to the study of Ontario’s natural heritage and was instrumental in the adoption of environmental planning and the identification of environmentally sensitive areas in Waterloo.

Kyle Clarke, a leader in outdoor education, received the Richards Education Award for engaging people in nature study and protection. A strong advocate for experiential learning that connects students with nature and instills a conservation ethic, Clarke initiated the Canadian Student Outdoor Education Conference.

River Murray (not pictured above), a young naturalist with Lambton Wildlife, received the Margaret and Carl Nunn Memorial Camp Scholarship Award for displaying a strong interest in natural history and impressive leadership abilities. Murray has participated in many club activities, including cleanups and plantings, and regularly encourages young people to get involved with Lambton Wildlife.

Donald J. Kerr received the Ian Shenstone Fraser Memorial Award for innovative work that contributes to the preservation of the Niagara Escarpment. Kerr is a long-time champion of the Silver Creek Wetland within the towns of Collingwood and the Blue Mountains, and is leading the campaign to transfer this wetland from private to public ownership.

Mark Eastman received the J.R. Dymond Public Service Award for public service work resulting in exceptional environmental achievement. Eastman has led numerous private land stewardship initiatives that help landowners understand the importance of invasive species control, wetland fencing and habitat protection.

Bruce Trail Conservancy, an organization committed to the protection and sustainable enjoyment of the Niagara Escarpment, received the Steve Hounsell Greenway Award for its contribution to Ontario Nature’s greenway efforts. The conservancy exemplifies the vision and achievements that are essential to establishing a greenway of protected habitat cores and corridors across southern Ontario.

CKL Flora, a project designed to document the plant life of the city of Kawartha Lakes, received the W.E. Saunders Natural History Award for its contribution to natural science. Project participants have collected five years’ worth of data, as well as plant specimens, from 89 Kawartha properties. CKL Flora is an example of the leadership and volunteerism that is essential for the protection of Ontario’s wild species and spaces.

Recipients for 2012

Naturalists from across the province participated in Ontario Nature’s 82nd annual general meeting and gathering at Cawthra Mulock Nature Reserve on June 8, 2013. The exceptional contributions of five individuals and one conservation group to natural habitat protection were recognized through the organization’s Conservation Awards.

Tom Cosburn – Ontario Nature Achievement Award

Tom CosburnAwarded to a member who has made an outstanding contribution to the activities of Ontario Nature.

Tom Cosburn has submitted more than 2,000 frog and toad recordings to Ontario Nature’s Reptile and Amphibian Atlas, making him one of the program’s top contributors. He is a passionate advocate for amphibian conservation.

 

Prince Edward County Field Naturalists – W.E. Saunders Natural History Award

Sheena KennedyAwarded to an individual or group that has achieved a significant goal related to natural history or natural science research, raising public awareness of natural history, demonstrating local leadership, saving a natural area, or generating conservation funds or publications.

The Prince Edward County Field Naturalists were part of a successful effort to have the south shore of the county designated an Important Bird Area. Recently, the group has been working tirelessly to raise public awareness of the environmental threats posed by proposed wind turbines at Ostrander Point. The group is currently appealing the Ministry of the Environment’s 2012 approval of the Ostrander Point project to the Environmental Review Tribunal.

Philip Gosling – W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award

Philip GoslingAwarded to an individual who demonstrates outstanding personal service and a strong commitment to nature conservation over a number of years with exceptional results.

Philip Gosling played a significant role in the founding of the Bruce Trail in the early 1960s. Later, he contributed to the broad recognition of the importance, protection and preservation of the Niagara Escarpment and its eventual designation as an UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve.

Chris Earley – Richards Education Award

Chris EarleyAwarded to an individual who has succeeded in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic supporters of conservation and environmental protection.

Chris Earley has been a dedicated educator of natural history for over 25 years – both as a committed volunteer, and an interpretive biologist and education coordinator at the Guelph Arboretum. He is passionate about helping people respect, understand and become enthusiastic supporters of the natural world and its conservation.

Jarmo Jalava – The Steve Hounsell Greenway Award

Jarmo JalavaAwarded to an individual, group or organization that contributes to the Greenway vision.

Jarmo Jalava is a life-long naturalist and current director of ecosystem recovery for the Carolinian Canada Coalition. He has worked to connect habitats by writing more than 120 reports and leading initiatives across the province. Recently, Jalava has focused on the fragmented Carolinian region where he has shown exceptional leadership and a deep reverence for nature.

Don McLean – J. R. Dymond Public Service Award
Don McLean
Awarded to an individual who shows distinguished public service that resulted in exceptional environmental achievement.

For the past 25 years, Don McLean has been a tireless volunteer advocate for conservation throughout the Hamilton area. He is probably best known for his dedicated efforts, as former chair of the Friends of the Red Hill Valley, to oppose construction of the Red Hill Valley Expressway. McLean is an inspiration and resource for everyone concerned about the conservation of natural heritage in Hamilton and beyond.

 

2011 Conservation Award Winners

2011 Conservation Award Winners
(left to right) Anita Caveney, accepted on behalf of Sandy Levin; Fraser and Owen Darling; Harry Lumsden; Dieter Shoenefeld; Ken Reger; Jenny Bull; and Mark Van Patter, on behalf of The County of Wellington (Photo Credit: Noah Cole)

Ontario Nature recognized the exceptional contributions of nine individuals and also the County of Wellington to natural habitat protection through the organization’s Conservation Awards on June 9, 2012.

Naturalists from across Ontario came together to celebrate Ontario Nature’s 81st annual gathering. The idyllic setting on the Frontenac Arch, with its exceptional natural diversity, set the stage for the awards ceremony. The deserving recipients are:

Ontario Nature Achievement Award – Dieter and Marlies Schoenefeld

Awarded to an Ontario Nature member(s) who has made an outstanding contribution to the activities of Ontario Nature.

As members and leaders of the Sudbury Field Naturalists for the past 30 years, Dieter and Marlies Schoenefeld have worked tirelessly to protect their natural surroundings. The couple are active citizen scientists and contributed to both editions of the Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Ontario as well as many other nature-related surveys.

W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award – Ken Reger

Awarded to individuals who demonstrate outstanding personal service and a strong commitment to nature conservation over a number of years with exceptional results.

Ken Reger has dedicated the past 20 years to reversing the decline in Ontario’s eastern bluebird populations by constructing and putting up almost 350 nesting boxes. His efforts have helped approximately 2,600 birds reach maturity. Reger’s work has won support from local citizens and farming communities as he travels some 300 kilometres every time he ventures out to check on his boxes.

Richards Education Award – Jenny Bull

Awarded to an individual who has succeeded in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic supporters of conservation and environmental protection.

Jenny Bull has fostered an awareness and appreciation of nature through the creation of teaching tools for elementary and high school students, developing techniques for plant identification, editing publications for the Toronto Field Naturalists and leading numerous field trips. She is a champion for ecological restoration on the Toronto islands and played a key role in developing the plant components of the biodiversity galleries at the ROM.

W.E. Saunders Natural History Award – Harry Lumsden

Awarded to an individual who has achieved a significant goal related to an aspect of natural history or natural science research, raising public awareness of natural history, demonstrating local leadership, saving a natural area, or generating conservation funds or publications.

When naturalists think about trumpeter swans in Ontario, they think about Harry Lumsden. Trumpeter swans had disappeared from the province, until Lumsden made their return his mission and launched the Ontario Trumpeter Swan Restoration Program in 1982. Today, Ontario can boast four thriving populations of these magnificent birds.

J. R. Dymond Public Service Award – Sandy Levin

Awarded to an individual or group who shows distinguished public service that resulted in exceptional environmental achievement.

Sandy Levin is a champion for woodland protection in London, Ontario. In 2006, developers launched an appeal to allow them access to 800 hectares of protected woods. Fearing that the city might not successfully defend itself, Levin hired a planner and a lawyer at his own expense to argue on behalf of conservation. His strategy paid off as the developers’ appeal was turned down.

The Lee Symmes Municipal Award – The County of Wellington

Awarded to a town, city or municipality or region that exhibits community leadership and exceptional achievement in planning or implementing programs that protect and regenerate the natural environment within a community.

Wellington County initiated its Green Legacy Program in 2004. Since that time, 1.3 million trees of more than two dozen native species have been planted by thousands of volunteers, mostly students. The program is now regarded as the largest municipal tree planting program in North America.

The Margaret and Carl Nunn Memorial Camp Scholarship Award – Fraser and Owen Darling; Bence Esztegar

Awarded to individuals who are 10 to 14 years of age, and display promise and interest in natural history interpretation or education and have the potential to take an increased leadership role in club programs.

Fraser, Owen and Bence are inspiring young naturalists who have committed countless volunteer hours to conservation in their neighbourhoods. Fraser and Owen belong to the Niagara Falls Nature Club and have done field work with at-risk snakes, assisted with bird banding and are active contributors to their school’s Eco Club.

Bence belongs to the Lambton Wildlife’s Young Naturalists. He has cleaned up trails, volunteered in community gardens and is recognized by his club leaders as an excellent role model, always willing to lend a hand to any project.

 

2010 Conservation Award Winners

2010 Conservation award recipients
(Back row, left to right) Skye MacKenzie, Allan Elgar, Linda Elgar, Fraser Gibson, Peter Delanty, Mia Frankl, Michael Mesure, Brendon Larson, Moe Qureshi (front row, left to right) Iris McGee, Renee Sandelowsky, Angela Martin, Marilyn Ohler, Jane Schneider, Stephanie Glanzmann

Ontario Nature Achievement Award – Jim Johnston

Jim Johnston is a tireless contributor to environmental and conservation issues in Ontario, with a particular emphasis on his enlightened approach to dealing with nuisance bears in and around Elliot Lake.  Jim spearheaded the development of the Elliot Lake Bear Smart Project, which subsequently became the Ministry of Natural Resource’s Bear Wise program. Jim has also initiated projects studying at-risk wood turtles as well as bird banding efforts, starting a wild rice re-introduction program, and building bird boxes for northern saw-whet owls, wood ducks and bluebirds.

W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award –Jane and Fred Schneider

For more than three decades, Jane and Fred Schneider have welcomed visitors to their 500-acre rural property outside Waterloo, which contains swamps, woodlands and fields. The Schneiders have planted hundreds of trees around their home, enhanced woodland and prairie habitat, and created a butterfly garden. They have led campaigns to protect the Waterloo moraine against urban sprawl and are widely respected for their knowledge of natural areas and their ability to find solutions.

The Steve Hounsell Greenway Award – Iris McGee, Renee Sandelowsky, Allan Elgar

Iris McGee, Renee Sandelowsky, and Allan Elgar founded the Oakvillegreen Conservation Association more than 10 years ago in response to a proposal to urbanize 7,600 acres of agricultural land in North Oakville. Since then, the group has spent countless hours raising awareness and fighting for a preservation plan that included a Natural Heritage System. Their victory was the inspiration for the subsequent Halton Natural Heritage System that now protects 50,000 acres including lands within the Greenbelt.

Richards Education Award – Fraser Gibson

Fraser Gibson has fostered environmental values and actions in children and adults throughout his career teaching outdoor and environmental education and has continued to promote the importance of the natural world in his retirement. Fraser was a founding member of the “What on Earth Are We Doing” committee dedicated to teaching staff and students about environmental issues in a natural setting. He has led countless nature walks, participated in dozens of butterfly and bird counts, maintains bee hives and monitors marshlands.

W.E. Saunders Natural History Award – Christine Hanrahan 

Christine Hanrahan has held a long-time commitment to building awareness about the importance of protecting and learning from the natural world. Whether writing articles, posting nature photos, advocating for conservation, leading nature outings or going on bird and butterfly counts, Christine is always able to awaken a sense of wonder in others.

J. R. Dymond Public Service Award – Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP)

The Fatal Light Awareness Program was established in 1993 by Michael Mesure and a team of volunteers dedicated to safeguarding migratory songbirds in the urban environment. FLAP has mobilized the NGO, business, educational, and government sectors to find progressive ways to protect birds from the hazards of the built environment.

The Lee Symmes Municipal Award – The County of Northumberland

Northumberland County initiated a comprehensive, public, Forest Management Plan process to best conserve a 5,400-acre forest on the Oak Ridges Moraine. By bringing together a 21 stakeholder advisory committee, the County brought peace to the forest under the spirit and intent of the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Act and Plan. Throughout the duration of the process, the County and its Council maintained its stance of putting sound ecological management first and foremost in all decision-making, thereby raising the standard in traditional county forest management.

Ontario Nature Corporate Award – Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance

The Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance has undertaken numerous energy conservation initiatives over the past decade, including a lighting retrofit throughout its facilities, lowering energy use during times of peak demand, and partnering with other organizations in progressive energy conservation and efficiency programs.

 

2009 Conservation Award Winners


Ontario Nature Conservation Award winners: (from left to right) Brendon Larson, president of the Ontario Nature board (on behalf of Vic Orr), Emily Conger (A2A), Megan Wilcox, Clarke Birchard, Cameron Smith, Dan Bissonnette, Gideon Foreman (CAPE), Tys Theysmeyer (Cootes to Escarpment Parks System), Jack Gingrich

Ontario Nature Achievement Award - Clarke Birchard

Awarded to an Ontario Nature member who has made an outstanding contribution to the activities of Ontario Nature.

Clarke Birchard is a tireless contributor to Ontario Nature’s reserve system as past chair of the nature reserves committee and continuing adviser. He is a member of the stewardship committee of the Kinghurst Forest Nature Reserve, and a “walking educator” during his hikes and restoration projects. His widespread network in Grey and Bruce Counties was critical in establishing the multi-stakeholder group for Ontario Nature’s Greenway initiative. Recently, Birchard helped secure a gift of additional land to Ontario Nature’s Petrel Point Nature Reserve, and he is an active participant in efforts to secure new reserves at Malcolm Bluff Shores.

W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award – Vic Orr

Awarded to individuals who demonstrate outstanding personal service and a strong commitment to nature conservation over a number of years with exceptional results.

Vic Orr played an instrumental role in the expansion, development and ongoing stewardship of the Altberg Wildlife Sanctuary Nature Reserve. Initially comprised of 101 hectares donated by Rudolph Altberg in 1983, the reserve now encompasses 470 hectares, straddling the landscape between the granite of the Canadian Shield and the limestone of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence forest - including the Burnt River watershed. He was chair of the Kawartha Field Naturalists Altberg Reserve stewardship committee for 17 years during a period of exceptional growth and development of its prime wildlife habitat. In 2006, the city of Kawartha Lakes named him Environmental Hero of the Year. Orr is a lifelong advocate for nature and naturalist who inspires others with his love of the wild.

The Steve Hounsell Greenway Award – Algonquin to Adirondacks Conservation Association

Awarded to an individual, group or organization who add a vital linking piece to the Greenway, preserve a core area, or build public support for preserving a natural heritage system, or lay the groundwork for a substantial legislative advance for greenway planning, or fight to restore a watershed, or any other action that contributes to the Greenway vision.

The Algonquin to Adirondacks Conservation Association (A2A) secured a significant "pinch point" on the Canadian side of the St. Lawrence River through a multi-year project designed to maintain ecological connectivity through a greenway from Algonquin Park, Ontario to Adirondack State Park, New York. The Gananoque River and the 19 lakes in its watershed were extensively mapped and surveyed by partners working under the A2A leadership. Moreover, private property owners are being recruited by A2A as volunteer stewards and taught how to naturalize their shorelines.

Richards Education Award – Dan Bissonnette

Awarded to an individual who has succeeded in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic supporters of conservation and environmental protection.

Dan Bissonnette has been instrumental in conducting public education and outreach in Windsor and Essex County about native plant gardening and landscaping through his extensive professional and volunteer work. A dedicated environmentalist, he runs an educational organization, the Naturalized Habitat Network and its Seeds of Hope initiative. Through his books, fact sheets, educational curriculum, courses and public outreach, Bissonnette has attracted considerable local media attention as he spreads the word about the importance of planting native species.

W.E. Saunders Natural History Award – Cameron Smith

Awarded to an individual who has achieved a significant goal related to an aspect of natural history or natural science research, raising public awareness of natural history, demonstrating local leadership, saving a natural area, or generating conservation funds or publications.

Author and environmental columnist, Cameron Smith was the driving force behind the establishment of Ontario Nature’s Lost Bay Nature Reserve, near Gananoque. For close to a decade afterwards, he tirelessly campaigned and fundraised to add the western half of this ecologically-important property. He was instrumental in adding 59 hectares to the reserve in October 2009. The reserve now encompasses more than 100 hectares of Canadian Shield and provincially significant wetlands, home to several endangered species. The reserve contributes to the Algonquin to Adirondacks corridor and lies within the new Frontenac Arch-Thousand Islands Biosphere Reserve.

J. R. Dymond Public Service Award – Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Awarded to an individual or group who shows distinguished public service that resulted in exceptional environmental achievement.

Canadian Association for Physicians for the Environment (CAPE) led a successful campaign to ban lawn and garden pesticides across Ontario. While several organizations participated in the campaign, CAPE developed the strategy and messaging that resulted in the passage of Ontario’s Cosmetic Pesticides Ban Act. As of April 2009, the act banned the cosmetic use and sale of some 250 toxic lawn products. The campaign was a model of smart, science-based advocacy conducted fearlessly against a well-funded industry lobby group. It led to the enactment of some of the strongest health-protection pesticide legislation in North America.

Ian Shenstone Fraser Memorial Award – Cootes to Escarpment Parks System, and its Steering Committee

Awarded to an individual or group who produce innovative work of exceptional quality that makes a contribution to the maintenance, protection, or preservation of the Niagara Escarpment.

Cootes to Escarpment Parks System, and its steering committee, was able to rally all major partners with lands in the 1,500-hectare proposed park pass resolutions that signalled their support. Officially launched in February 2010, this globally significant urban park would stretch from Hamilton Harbour, through Cootes Paradise, to a 10-kilometre section of the Niagara Escarpment. It is the only piece of the escarpment that is not separated from Lake Ontario’s wetlands by a 400-series highway. The system will provide an important layer of protection and enhancement for existing green areas, including the Niagara Escarpment. Although much work remains to be done to turn the vision into reality, the steering committee has already established a critical mass of supporters and attracted major media support.

Margaret and Carl Nunn Memorial Camp Scholarship – Megan Wilcox

Awarded to youth who are 10-14 years of age, who display promise and interest in natural history interpretation or education and have the potential to take an increased leadership role in club programs.

Megan Wilcox has shown a strong willingness to help and positive attitude in her volunteer work with Kids for Turtles in Norfolk County and Backus Camps. She has proven herself to be a capable young leader and has already demonstrated a keen interest in teaching other kids about the environment. She will be attending Camp Kawartha’s four-day nature camp at the end of the summer “because,” she says, “I love learning pretty much about anything.”

 

2008 Conservation Award Winners

Conservation Award 2008
Ontario Nature Conservation Award winners: (from left to right) Stewart Nutt, Stan Caveney on behalf of the Thames Talbot Land Trust, Drew Monkman, Ron Reid, Kim Gavine on behalf of the Oak Ridges Moraine Foundation, Normand Dumont on behalf of RONA and Robin Emms (in front).

The Steve Hounsell Greenway Award – Thames Talbot Land Trust

Awarded to an individual, group or organization who add a vital linking piece to the Greenway, preserve a core area, or build public support for preserving a natural heritage system, or lay the groundwork for a substantial legislative advance for greenway planning, or fight to restore a watershed, or any other action that contributes to the Greenway vision.

The first winner of Ontario Nature's new Steve Hounsell Greenway Award is the Thames Talbot Land Trust for outstanding leadership in preserving the 148-hectare Joany's Woods which serves as a green corridor along the Ausable River close to Pinery Provincial Park. The Trust's effective fundraising campaign and public outreach built strong local support for preserving this large forested property, featuring Carolinian and rare species. By preserving Joany's Woods, one of the few provincially significant forests in Middlesex county and part of an important watershed, the Trust has made a major contribution to Ontario's Greenway.

W. E. Saunders Natural History Award – Stewart Nutt

Awarded to an individual who has achieved a significant goal related to an aspect of natural history or natural science research, raising public awareness of natural history, demonstrating local leadership, saving a natural area, or generating conservation funds or publications.

Stewart Nutt organized and led a major effort to save endangered piping plovers nesting at Sauble and Wasaga Beaches. Nutt formed a motivated team of local volunteers to guard the nesting sites, brought the community on side, and attracted media interest in the plight of these small shorebirds. The plovers successfully fledged three young in 2007 and two more in 2008.

Ontario Nature Corporate Award – RONA

Awarded to a corporation demonstrating outstanding leadership or sound action in the environmental field and for protecting the natural environment either directly through corporate policies or through a major initiative(s), or indirectly through other undertakings that have stimulated significant environmental actions.

RONA received the Ontario Nature Corporate Award for leadership for developing a strong procurement policy for the wood products sold in its hardware and renovation stores. RONA gives purchasing preference to suppliers that share the company's commitment to sustainable forestry. In 2008, RONA announced that 100 percent of the lumber sold in its stores must come from eco-certified sources by the end of 2010 and, by 2012, 25 percent of this lumber must bear the Forest Stewardship Council certification logo.

Carl Nunn Media and Conservation Award – Drew Monkman

Awarded to an individual, team or media outlet that has engaged in effective communication on one or more conservation issues.

Drew Monkman is an inspirational teacher at Edmison Heights Public School who, with his students, created a natural habitat for wildlife on the grounds of this Peterborough-area school. Monkman's nominators felt his most significant impact has been through his popular weekly column, "Our Changing Seasons," in the Peterborough Examiner, which reaches thousands of readers with his environmental and nature preservation message.

Richards Education Award – Diane Lawrence

Awarded to an individual who has succeeded in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic supporters of conservation and environmental protection.

Diane Lawrence has been the inspiring volunteer coordinator of the Kingston Field Naturalists' youth program for 28 years. Lawrence plans activities that emphasize hands-on experience for both the Junior and Teen Naturalists, displaying an exemplary long-term commitment that has helped many young people become dedicated naturalists and professionals in the natural sciences field.

W.W. Gunn Conservation Award – Ron Reid

Awarded to individuals who demonstrate outstanding personal service and a strong commitment to nature conservation over a number of years with exceptional results.

Ron Reid received the prestigious W.W. Gunn Conservation Award for exemplary leadership in a long, illustrious career of nature conservation. Reid has served as Conservation Director for Ontario Nature, as a leader of the successful campaign to save the Oak Ridges Moraine and was the founding President of the Couchiching Conservancy. Reid also played an integral role in land protection on the eastern shore of Georgian Bay. Reid is retiring next month as Executive Director of the Couchiching Conservancy, a leading land trust that now owns or manages more than 3,000 hectares of protected land in the Couchiching-Severn region.

Margaret and Carl Nunn Memorial Camp Scholarship – Robin Emms, Kids for Turtles

Awarded to youth who are 10-14 years of age, who display promise and interest in natural history interpretation or education and have the potential to take an increased leadership role in club programs.

Twelve-year-old Robin Emms has been an active participant in Kids for Turtles environmental education activities, and has a personal passion for monarch butterflies, 30 of which she has raised and released into the wild. Emms will attend Camp Kawartha's Nature Camp for four days this summer.

J.R Dymond Public Service Award – Oak Ridges Moraine Foundation

Awarded to an individual or group who shows distinguished public service that resulted in exceptional environmental achievement.

The Oak Ridges Moraine Foundation has multiplied its original provincial financing with private and public sector funds, and is attracting landowner donations in its efforts to preserve and protect the Oak Ridges Moraine. The foundation has become a model for developing community and stakeholder partnerships to protect the environmental values of the Moraine.

Back to top


 

2007 Conservation Award Winners

2007 Conservation Award
AGM Conference And Awards Ceremony 2007 Conservation Award Winners: (from left to right) Brigitte Angster-Beckett, Mayor Ron Stevens, Lou Probst, Cameron Gray, Bob Curry, Grace Thornton, Chris Gosselin, Audrey Wilson, Jacob Rodenburg and William Gardiner (in the front).

W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award - Lou Probst

Awarded to individuals who demonstrate outstanding personal service and a strong commitment to nature conservation over a number of years with exceptional results.

Richards Education Award – Jacob Rodenburg

Awarded to an individual who has succeeded in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic supporters of conservation and environmental protection.

W.E. Saunders Natural History Award – Bob Curry

Awarded to an individual who has achieved a significant goal related to an aspect of natural history or natural science research, raising public awareness of natural history, demonstrating local leadership, saving a natural area, or generating conservation funds or publications.

Lee Symmes Municipal Award – City of Orillia and Region of Waterloo

Awarded to a municipality, town, city or region that exhibits community leadership and exceptional achievement in planning or implementing programs that protect and regenerate the natural environment within a community.

J. R. Dymond Public Service Award – Junction Creek Stewardship Committee

Awarded to an individual who shows distinguished public service that resulted in exceptional environmental achievement.

Ontario Nature Achievement Award – Audrey E. Wilson

Awarded to an Ontario Nature member who has made an outstanding contribution to the activities of Ontario Nature.

Awards were presented to the winners at the Awards Ceremony on Friday, June 8th, 2007. Congratulations to the award recipients!

Margaret and Carl Nunn Memorial Camp Scholarship Award – William Gardiner, Phoenix Jacobs Parkin, Grace Thornton and Cameron Gray

Awarded to youth who are 10-15 years of age, who display promise and interest in natural history interpretation or education and have the potential to take an increased leadership role in club programs.

Awards were presented to the winners at the Awards Ceremony on Saturday, June 7th at 5:00 p.m. Congratulations to the award recipients!

Back to top


2006 Conservation Award Winners

Conservation Awards 2006
AGM Conference And Awards Ceremony 2006 Conservation Award Winners: (from left to right) Eric Card, representing Windsor Regional Hospital, Dr. Myra McCormick accepting on behalf of Dr. Nicholas Escott, Bob Bowles and Terry Carr.

W.W.H. Gunn Conservation Award – Robert Bowles

Awarded to individuals who demonstrate outstanding personal service and a strong commitment to nature conservation over a number of years with exceptional results.

Richards Education Award – Terry Carr

Awarded to an individual who has succeeded in helping people understand the natural world and become enthusiastic supporters of conservation and environmental protection.

W.E. Saunders Natural History Award – Dr. Nicholas Escott

Awarded to an individual who has achieved a significant goal related to an aspect of natural history or natural science research, raising public awareness of natural history, demonstrating local leadership, saving a natural area, or generating conservation funds or publications.

Ontario Nature Corporate Award – Windsor Regional Hospital

Awarded to a corporation demonstrating outstanding leadership or sound action in the environmental field and for protecting the natural environment either directly through corporate policies or through a major initiative(s), or indirectly through other undertakings that have stimulated significant environmental actions.
Awards were presented to the winners at the Awards Ceremony on Friday, June 8th, 2007. Congratulations to the award recipients!

Back to top

Donate Now
Sign up for  E-news
   JOIN US
Twitter   Facebook   YouTube

Pinterest   blog   instagram
On Nature