Ontario Reptile and Amphibian
Atlas
Program

The Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas is a citizen-science project that tracks distributions and spatial trends of reptiles and amphibians across the province over time. The over-arching goal is to increase the collective knowledge base of reptiles and amphibians. Equally important, however, is the engagement of non-scientists of all ages and abilities, in all parts of the province, in nature study and conservation. 

Reptiles and amphibians are experiencing global declines of 20 and 40 percent respectively. In Ontario, 75 percent of reptiles and 35 percent of amphibians are listed as nationally and provincially at-risk.

Report your sightings

We need volunteer citizen scientists of all levels to submit sightings of all reptile and amphibian species, not just the rare ones.

Field Guide

Check out our comprehensive field guide about Ontario's reptiles and amphibians including descriptions, habitat, biology, threats and trends, range maps, and current status and protection.

Click here for interactive range maps.

Other ways to get involved

  • Book a presentation or organize a local survey event in your area.
  • Inquire about potential partnership opportunities including amalgamating existing databases.
  • Join our atlas mailing list to receive conservation and species news.
  • Attend an atlas event or workshop.

Related atlases

An earlier atlas, called the Ontario Herpetofaunal Summary Atlas, provided extensive information about where many of the province’s reptiles and amphibians occurred. However, much of that information now needs to be updated. Over the winter of 2008/2009, the Eastern Ontario Model Forest developed an Eastern Ontario Herpetofaunal Atlas, which was the pilot program for our province-wide atlas program.

Please email us at atlas@ontarionature.org if you have any questions or would like to learn more about the Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.

The Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas is guided by a steering committee of experts and partner organizations, including Ontario Parks, Toronto Zoo and Ministry of Natural Resources and Forests, as well as the two organizers of the original Ontario Herpetofaunal Summary.

Ontario Nature is grateful for the support of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestsí Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC), Environment Canada, Eastern Ontario Model Forest (EOMF), and other government agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

Ontario Trillium Foundation Environment Canada logo

 

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