Ontario Nature Blog

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Tag: bioblitz (Page 1 of 2)

Sun’s out, apps out: Our Digital Bioblitz starts today!

Whether your summer adventures are already underway or just on the horizon, we’re asking you to participate in our Digital BioBlitz – a new take on the traditional BioBlitz. We’re bringing people together from across Ontario to use our new atlas app to record more reptile and amphibian sightings.

Here’s how you can participate:

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Under the Canopy: Bioblitzing at the Sydenham River Nature Reserve

Over two kilometres of the Sydenham River winds through the Ontario Nature property; Credit: David Coulson

The Sydenham River Nature Reserve is Ontario Nature’s first riverine reserve. Acquired in December 2016, the property is located within the Carolinian Life Zone that stretches from Windsor to Toronto. It is an area that includes some of the most significant habitats and threatened plant and animal species in Ontario.

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A rare experience

Lea Grie points out a common tern flying over the Grand River, CREDIT: David Coulson

Leanne Grieves points out a common tern flying over the Grand River, CREDIT: David Coulson

“Look!” Someone says, pointing to the sky.

Standing in an open field, camera in hand, I peer up wondering what has been spotted. Suddenly, a large brown bird swoops down, disappears into the trees, and reappears with a fish in its talons.

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Documenting Life at George G. Newton Nature Reserve

Volunteers learn how to catch and identify butterflies, Photo credit: Lynn Miller

Volunteers learn how to catch and identify butterflies, Photo credit: Lynn Miller

Late last month, Ontario Nature’s conservation staff hosted a bioblitz at George G. Newton Nature Reserve, near Goderich. The day kicked off with two sessions, one focused on reptiles and amphibians and the other focused on plants. Jory Mullen of the Huron Stewardship Council led the amphibians and reptiles group. They found six green frogs, one leopard frog and four wood frogs in the stream running through the reserve. They also found nine red-backed salamanders in the forest.

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An Exciting Time for Citizen Science

Thunder Bay bioblitz, Credit: Julee Boan

Thunder Bay bioblitz, Credit: Julee Boan

Are you an aspiring citizen scientist? All over the world, members of the public contribute to scientific research by reporting species sightings, surveying water quality and more. You can join these citizen scientists with the help of Ontario Nature’s new Directory of Ontario Citizen Science (DOCS).

DOCS is an online, searchable tool that can link you with citizen science projects in your area. It can also help groups coordinating citizen science activities to publicize their projects and attract volunteers. DOCS is aimed at projects with biological, environmental, or conservation goals, and there are lots of them available.

Citizen science has been around for more than 100 years.

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