Ontario Nature Blog

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Category: Gardening (Page 1 of 2)

How to grow native plants to help protect pollinators

Credit: Colleen Dempster

Growing native wildflowers from seed is fun and rewarding. It beautifies your backyard in an ecologically-friendly way and can be done for little start-up cost and maintenance! Here are five simple steps you can take to turn your native wildflower seeds into a backyard oasis for yourself and the wildlife that visits.

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Planting for Pollinators in Kinghurst Forest

Participants take a well-deserved break after planting 180 wildflowers, Credit: Lynn Miller

Participants take a well-deserved break after planting 180 wildflowers, Credit: Lynn Miller

The Ontario Nature Youth Council’s Special Spaces events have wrapped up for this year. All of them were extremely successful, but the highlight for me was the wildflower planting event I attended at Kinghurst Forest Nature Reserve.

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Simple Window Treatments to Stop Residential Bird Strikes

Canada warbler, credit: Robert McCaw

Canada warbler, credit: Robert McCaw

In one month last fall, I heard the heartbreaking thud of six birds hitting windows at my home. I care about birds, so I decided to do something.

The Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP) estimates that 100 million to 1 billion North American birds are killed annually in collisions with windows. Residential homes are the biggest hazard. They kill or injure more songbirds than all other buildings combined.

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Let’s plant natives!

diana's blog top photo sm

Imagine you are relaxing in your beautiful garden, enjoying the natural beauty, the sounds, the colors, the scents. Now imagine you could do all of this and contribute to the protection of native biodiversity at the same time. You can make this happen by adding native plants to your garden.

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What’s a gardener to do?

Bumble bee and honey bee on butterfly milkweed. Credit: Martin LaBar

Bumblebee and honey bee on butterfly milkweed. Credit: Martin LaBar

Much of the discussion around neonicotinoids focuses on agriculture, but the horticulture industry also uses these chemicals. In a 2014 Friends of the Earth study of flowers for sale at garden centres in Canada, more than 50 percent of the tested plants contained traces of at least one neonicotinoid. Most shocking was that many of these contaminated plants were labelled “bee-friendly”.

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