Ontario Nature Blog

Protecting wild species and wild spaces since 1931

Category: Conservation science at your doorstep (Page 1 of 2)

Antler flies and the moose antler – an ecosystem unto itself!

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You’re out for a walk in the woods and come across a dropped moose antler. In your excitement you pick-up the hefty piece of bone and think about taking it home, mounting it on your wall, placing it on the mantelpiece, or stashing it in the garage to collect dust, but is that really a good idea?

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Why Caribou-t it?

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For decades biologists have been observing declines in woodland caribou across Canada and much effort has been put into understanding caribou range retraction and population loss. As Canadians we are attracted to woodland caribou because of their beauty and elusiveness and have granted them national icon status. Their loss is our loss, which is why Canadians care about protecting woodland caribou.

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Can genetics help bats?

conservation_FinalSummer evenings used to be filled with the acrobatic flitting of bats chasing their next insect meal. Unfortunately, bats have vacated the night sky over much of eastern North America due to an invasive fungal disease that is decimating populations.

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Which wild pollinators are in decline and why?

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There are 1,000s of wild pollinators in Ontario. Bees and flies are most significant, but butterflies, beetles, wasps, ants, moths and hummingbirds also pollinate plants. It is important to keep this in mind when reading about pollinator decline, which has been a hot news topic for many years.

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Stopping the invasion

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Round goby Photo Courtesy Flickr; CC 2.0; Credit: Matthew Forte via Ohio Sea Grant

Nearly two centuries ago, non-native aquatic species began their invasion of the Great Lakes, travelling within the ballast stones and ballast water of large ships.

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