Ontario Nature Blog

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Category: Reptile and Amphibian Atlas (Page 1 of 7)

How you can help turtles cross the road

Credit: James Paterson

Many of us have seen turtles on the road in May and June – they look like dark, round speed bumps or tire pieces. Perhaps you have swerved your car around one, or stopped to help one safely across the road. Why are roads such a major threat to turtle survival and how can you help?

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Your guide to the updated Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas app

Credit: Camille Tremblay Beaulieu

Credit: Camille Tremblay Beaulieu

Spring has sprung and wildlife is on the move. While exploring a natural area, you might find a snake crossing the trail, a turtle basking on a log, or frogs calling. Now you can report this sighting to the Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas (ORAA) using our new and improved app! By harnessing the power of citizen science, you can increase the collective knowledge of herpetofauna to inform conservation science.

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At long last, an end to the snapping turtle hunt

Snapping turtle; Credit: Jory Mullen

Credit: Jory Mullen

It has been a long time coming. Alongside our members, supporters, member groups and partners, Ontario Nature spent years trying to convince the Government of Ontario to end the hunting of snapping turtles, a species at risk. And finally, on Friday March 31, the government announced its decision to terminate the hunt. This was the only correct decision in light of irrefutable scientific evidence that snapping turtles cannot be sustainably hunted. Taking just one or two adults from a population on a yearly basis will lead to decline.

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Why I Love Frogs (And You Should, Too)

EmmaWithFrog

A young Emma holding a frog; Photo courtesy of Emma Horrigan

One of my first introductions to nature as a kid was observing tadpoles on the Toronto Islands and catching frogs at the Forks of the Credit Provincial Park. No outdoor adventure was complete without looking for and finding frogs.

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A Mud-WHAT?: Searching for the Elusive Mudpuppy

ORAA Crowley Mudpuppy

“A Mud-WHAT?!”…This slightly confused inquiry is one that I often get when I talk about Ontario’s largest salamander, the mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus).

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