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Category: Reptile and Amphibian Atlas (Page 1 of 7)

Turtle crossing: how to help injured turtles on Ontario roads

Credit: Gabriel Esler; CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Seven of Ontario’s eight turtle species are provincially at risk. By helping a turtle cross the road, you contribute to their conservation. But what if you spot a turtle that’s injured, or possibly dead? Check out our Q & A to help you take action during your travels.

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Sun’s out, apps out: Participate in our Digital Bioblitz!

Whether your summer adventures are already underway or just on the horizon, we’re asking you to participate in our Digital BioBlitz – a new take on the traditional BioBlitz. We’re bringing people together from across Ontario to use our new atlas app to record more reptile and amphibian sightings.

Here’s how you can participate:

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How you can help turtles cross the road

Credit: James Paterson

Many of us have seen turtles on the road in May and June – they look like dark, round speed bumps or tire pieces. Perhaps you have swerved your car around one, or stopped to help one safely across the road. Why are roads such a major threat to turtle survival and how can you help?

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Your guide to the updated Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas app

Credit: Camille Tremblay Beaulieu

Credit: Camille Tremblay Beaulieu

Have you spotted a reptile or amphibian? Now you can report your sightings to the Ontario Reptile and Amphibian Atlas (ORAA) using our new and improved app! By harnessing the power of citizen science, you can increase the collective knowledge of herpetofauna to inform conservation science.

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At long last, an end to the snapping turtle hunt

Snapping turtle; Credit: Jory Mullen

Credit: Jory Mullen

It has been a long time coming. Alongside our members, supporters, member groups and partners, Ontario Nature spent years trying to convince the Government of Ontario to end the hunting of snapping turtles, a species at risk. And finally, on Friday March 31, the government announced its decision to terminate the hunt. This was the only correct decision in light of irrefutable scientific evidence that snapping turtles cannot be sustainably hunted. Taking just one or two adults from a population on a yearly basis will lead to decline.

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