Ontario Nature Blog

Protecting wild species and wild spaces since 1931

Author: Guest blogger (Page 2 of 7)

New Caledon hiking guide – a labour of love

"Caledon Hikes: Loops & Lattes" author stops for a coffee while hiking in Caledon.

“Caledon Hikes: Loops & Lattes” author stops for a coffee while hiking in Caledon.

My partner Alex isn’t much into birthdays. So two years ago, it came as a big surprise when, with a wry grin, he dropped the biggest birthday gift ever on my proverbial lap. It wasn’t jewelry or a car or a luxury vacation. Instead, what Alex gave me was part promise and part challenge.

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What’s up with the snakes?

Eastern ribbonsnake photo by Joe Crowley.

Eastern ribbonsnake photo by Joe Crowley.

Thirty years ago, hundreds of naturalists, biologists and outdoorsmen in Ontario began archiving hundreds of thousands of reptile and amphibian observations. Twenty-five years later, Ontario Nature continued and expanded that data collection to the entire province.

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A field of songs

Eastern meadowlark taking flight

Eastern meadowlark taking flight

Bobolinks don’t wait to land on a fence post to sing; they sing as they fly, pouring music over the green fields. There is a road near Peterborough with grassy fields on both sides where bobolinks nest. It’s a quiet road where I can sit and watch them fluttering over the grass and listen to their splendid songs.

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Conservation intern responds to ESA ruling

Blanding's turtle hatchlings by Scott Gillingwater.

Blanding’s turtle hatchlings by Scott Gillingwater.

Last month, Ontario’s Divisional Court upheld the provincial regulation 176/13 which provides major industries, such as forestry, energy transmission and mining, extensive exemptions from prohibitions outlined in the once “gold standard” Endangered Species Act (ESA).

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Invaders with personality

conservation_Final

People have different personalities. Some are shy; others are bold. Some are extraverted; others are introverted. These personality traits influence our academic success, job performance, personal relationships, health and susceptibility to disease. In the McLaughlin Lab at the University of Guelph, we are interested in detecting personality differences in animals and determining whether this kind of information can inform management. One of our projects focuses on the non-native sea lamprey and its management in the Great Lakes.

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