Ontario Nature Blog

Protecting wild species and wild spaces since 1931

Sharp-tailed grouse courtship

grouse1_dotto_1 resizedSharp-tailed grouse is a chicken-like bird that inhabits grasslands, brushy prairies and edges of woodlands. The species ranges from eastern Quebec to central BC and into the Northwest Territories and the Yukon.

Read More

How my smartphone enhances my outdoor experiences

Chloe Stanois, Ontario Nature communications intern, enjoys visiting natural areas and gardens.

Chloe Stanois, Ontario Nature communications intern, enjoys visiting natural areas and gardens.

The growing popularity of smartphones has sparked debates about the negative implications of our over-reliance on technology. In particular, there is much discussion about the need to spend less time staring at a screen and more time being active and interacting with nature.

Read More

Public participation in coordinated plan review

Waterfall in Caledon area. Credit: Tim Hagen

Waterfall in Caledon area. Credit: Tim Hagen

The coordinated review of the Greenbelt Plan, the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan, the Niagara Escarpment Plan, and the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH) is now underway. A major component of the review is a series of government-hosted public meetings.

Read More

Driven to endangerment or en route to recovery?

conservation_Final

The car is a marvellous machine. With a turn of the key and a tank full of gas, it offers freedom and convenience. In our ever-increasing desire to move from one place to another, we have constructed an impressive network of roads. This is especially true in southern Ontario, as James and Jacqueline point out in “Helping turtles not cross the road.” 

Read More

What’s a gardener to do?

Bumble bee and honey bee on butterfly milkweed. Credit: Martin LaBar

Bumblebee and honey bee on butterfly milkweed. Credit: Martin LaBar

Much of the discussion around neonicotinoids focuses on agriculture, but the horticulture industry also uses these chemicals. In a 2014 Friends of the Earth study of flowers for sale at garden centres in Canada, more than 50 percent of the tested plants contained traces of at least one neonicotinoid. Most shocking was that many of these contaminated plants were labelled “bee-friendly”.

Read More

Page 1 of 24